Evergreen Issues: Rising sea threatens Internet cables, Greenland village holds breath and major startup cuts meat

EVERY TUESDAY WE BRING YOU ISSUES THAT IMPACT YOU AS AN OUTDOOR LOVING WOMAN. WHETHER IT HAS TO DO WITH CLIMATE CHANGE OR FEMALE EMPOWERMENT, WE SCOUR THE INTERNET, INCLUDING GOVERNMENT BILLS, SOCIAL MEDIA AND LOCAL AND NATIONAL NEWS, AND DELIVER IT TO YOU – SO YOU KNOW.

1. Rising sea levels could interfere with Internet infrastructure

New research about rising sea levels paints a grisly picture for Internet infrastructure along the East Coast of the U.S. in the next 15 years, NPR reports.

One of the authors of the analyses, Ramakrishnan Durairajan, a computer scientist at the University of Oregon, explains that the wires and hardware that make the Internet function could end up underwater.

Via NPR:

“The analysis estimates under the most severe model for sea level rise that more than 4,000 miles of fiber optic cable along U.S. coastlines will be underwater by the early 2030s.”

You’ve probably heard of the giant cables buried deep within the Atlantic and Pacific oceans which are designed to be permanently underwater, but other infrastructure like copper wiring and power stations are not. These items are simply buried along roads and through tunnels, according to NPR.

If thousands of miles of cable are flooded, millions of Americans living in major cities could be affected.

2. Greenland Village faces wrath of looming iceberg

The images are startling (if you consume any news, chances are, you’ve already seen them:

Compilation courtesy of USA Today

A small village in Greenland is sitting below a giant iceberg that recently floated into the area. The massive chunk of ice is 650 wide and stands nearly 300 feet above sea level, the New York Times reports. If it breaks, scientists say it could wash away parts of the town.

The 169 residents of Innaarsuit are waiting with bated breath – strong winds could send the iceberg back out to see. However, a substantial amount of rain could make it break apart, which could cause destructive waves. 33 people have been evacuated to higher ground.

A Danish ship is standing by should it be needed for rescue efforts – the town is extremely isolated and the power plant is dangerously close to the water’s edge.

3. CO-WORKING STARTUP REMOVES MEAT FROM MENU AT 200+ LOCATIONS WORLDWIDE

20 billion dollar startup WeWork is removing meat from the menus of its 200 plus locations around the world, the company announced Friday.

A spokeswoman confirmed to TechCrunch that the co-working company will no longer serve red meat, poultry and pork from in-house menus nor reimburse it on expense reports. Employees are still free to bring meat to work, if they prefer to eat it.

WeWork has some 200,000 members globally, with 6,000 of its own employees. The policy change is meant to reduce the business’ impact on the environment.

Our sustainability expert, Sheila McMenamin, dove into this issue in her latest Tiny but Useful installment.