Evergreen Issues: New plan for Keystone XL gets positive review, Ginsberg remains committed and physicist takes mission to Wikipedia

EVERY TUESDAY WE BRING YOU ISSUES THAT IMPACT YOU AS AN OUTDOOR LOVING WOMAN. WHETHER IT HAS TO DO WITH CLIMATE CHANGE OR FEMALE EMPOWERMENT, WE SCOUR THE INTERNET, INCLUDING GOVERNMENT BILLS, SOCIAL MEDIA AND LOCAL AND NATIONAL NEWS, AND DELIVER IT TO YOU – SO YOU KNOW.

1. Favorable Review Delivered for Keystone XL’s new route

A new review released by the U.S. State Department finds that the new planned route for the Keystone XL Pipeline would NOT have a serious environmental impact.

The Washington Post reports the study shows Nebraska’s water, land and wildlife would be unscathed by pipeline developer TransCanada’s construction of a 1,184-mile oil pipeline.

The Sierra Club blasted the report:

“’Once again, the Trump administration is attempting to take a shortcut around the legally required review process on Keystone XL, putting our communities at risk for the sake of propping up the Canadian tar sands industry,’ said Kelly Martin, director of the Sierra Club Beyond Dirty Fuels Campaign.”

– via bloomberg

Opponents, including environmentalists, Native American tribes and some landowners, have repeatedly halted the project. Their latest attempt is a lawsuit pending before the Nebraska Supreme Court, where oral arguments won’t come until October at the soonest.

The state department’s draft study, released Monday, will be up for public input through August 29.

2. (aT LEAST) five more years for Ruth Bader Ginsberg

Justice Ginsberg says she’s not going anywhere. The 85-year-old says she’ll spend “at least” five more years serving the nation’s highest court.

The timing of Justice Ginsberg’s announcement was noted by The Washington Post: 

“SUpreme Court justices aren’t supposed to be political actors, and they aren’t supposed to time their retirements to ensure they are replaced with a like-minded justice.

But Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s latest comment about when she will retire is almost impossible to separate from politics. Indeed, it almost seems to send a concerted signal to liberals not to worry about her handing President Trump another Supreme Court vacancy.”

Ginsberg was nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court by former President Bill Clinton in 1993. She has served for 25 years. Her presence has traditionally provided a resounding liberal voice in major cases like the legalization of same-sex marriage.

Ginsberg has been treated for cancer twice. Now, she maintains her health with hour-long workout sessions with a personal trainer.

3. Physicist writes 270 Wikipedia profiles to highlight female scientists

A British physicist has taken her mission to get more girls into STEM, to Wikipedia.

Dr. Jess Wade

The Huffington Post reports that Dr. Jess Wade personally wrote 270 different profiles for “trailblazing female scientists.” Penning one each night, she says it took her less than a year.

Dr. Wade told Huffington Post that as a female Ph.D. student, she was a minority in her program. The lack of women entering science, technology, engineering and math really got to her, so she started encouraging younger women to get involved. In particular, she focused on changing the messaging around women in science – big picture stuff. Writing these web bios was one part of achieving that.